Perspective

Interview with Wangui Kimari: Hustling for security

Wednesday, 27 July 2016 2777 Views 0 Comments
Tell us about yourself? 
I am a researcher and the participatory action research coordinator for Mathare Social
Justice Centre (MSJC). I am also a PhD  candidate in the Department of Anthropology at York University, Canada.
Wangui-V
What keeps you motivated ? 
I am motivated by the people I meet every day. I am especially inspired by many people I 
have met in Mathare, Korogocho and other poor urban and rural settlements in the 
country who make due with materially very little—but with lots of courage. 
 
Do tell us about your recent research? 
My own research looks at the intersection between urban planning and police violence. I 
also recently took part in a comparative research project that looked at how non-state 
report, Hustling for Security, here. 
 
what was the motivation behind the research? 
The research was part of a deeply ethnographic comparative research project (Beirut, 
Tunis, Nairobi) whose task was to understand how non-state actors offer security in 
urban areas, and especially to communities often undeserved (and often jeopardized—in the case of Kenya.
what challenges did face while trying to define security? 
 It was really important for this project to emphasize the intersections of security with
economic justice, gender dimensions, service provision etc.; security is related to 
structural issues and is not just protection from physical violence. 
1
 
In the research, you mention that people turn to alternative sources of refuge when the 
government fails; can you mention these sources? 
Some key sources of protection are youth groups and women human rights defenders. 
 
What are the factors that make the government fail in providing security? 
 
The state security apparatus in Kenya is rarely held accountable—there are barely any 
functional public mechanisms that can get them to account for anything and thus it 
often embraces extra-legal practices in poor urban settlements. Furthermore, many 
youth in these poor areas are often deemed ‘criminals’ in public discourse without a 
broader examination of the conditions that creates crime. When we regard security as a 
punitive measure instead of a structural issue then that allows for what has become our 
‘normal’ security provision ( high gates, more police), and that is failing. 
 
Is the case specific to Kenya or is it a global phenomena? 
As we can see from Black Lives Matter, or the recent case of a police man in Manipur, 
India who admitted to killing over 100 people, this is a global issue. 
Any policy advice after the research? 
Any future governance work on security provision in Kenya should include the voices of 
those most at risk. Furthermore, it should take into consideration socio-economic 
determinants of crime, as well as historicize the continuities between the current formal 
state security actors and their colonial predecessors. Finally, there should really be an 
understanding that the mode of policing in poor urban settlements creates more 
insecurity than security. 
 
Thanks, WK 

Nakhumicha

15 posts | 9 comments

Comments are closed.